Things tagged 'consultations'

limited to the area of Epping Forest Transport Action Group:

10 issues found for 'consultations':

  • Redbridge LIP

    Created by Simon Still // 1 thread

    The Local Implementation Plan (LIP) sits underneath the Local Plan and sets out our commitments to make the changes outlined in the Local Plan a reality.

    This LIP also identifies how the London Borough of Redbridge will work with Transport for London (TfL) towards achieving the Mayor's Transport Strategy goals of:

    • Healthy Streets and healthy people
    • A good public transport experience
    • New homes and jobs

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  • New London Plan 2017

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    London.gov.uk says:

    What is the new London Plan?
    The London Plan is one of the most important documents for this city.
    It's a strategic plan which shapes how London evolves and develops. All planning decisions should follow London Plan policies, and it sets a policy framework for local plans across London.
    The current 2016 consolidation Plan is still the adopted Development Plan. However the Draft London Plan is a material consideration in planning decisions. It gains more weight as it moves through the process to adoption, however the weight given to it is a matter for the decision maker.

    Consultation on the draft London Plan
    Consultation on this plan is open. Comments will be publicly available. After the consultation, comments are reviewed by an inspector and you may be called in to discuss comments at the Examination in Public.

    What is an Examination in Public?
    At the end of the consultation period your comments will be reviewed by the independent Planning Inspector appointed by the Secretary of State to carry out the Examination in Public for the London Plan.
    You may be invited to discuss your comments at the Examination in Public. All comments will be made available to the public at the end of the consultation period. The legal provisions for the London Plan are in Part VIII of the Greater London Authority (GLA) Act 1999 (as amended) in sections 334 to 341. The Examination in Public is covered in Section 338.

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  • Heavy Goods Vehicles Safety Standard Permit /Direct Vision Standard

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    Tfl says:

    We have undertaken research that shows that in 2015, Heavy Goods Vehicles (HGVs) were involved in disproportionately high numbers of fatal collisions with cyclists (78 per cent) and pedestrians (20 per cent) on London’s streets, despite only making up four per cent of the overall miles driven in the Capital. The Direct Vision Standard (DVS) forms part of The Mayor, Sadiq Khan and TfL’s Vision Zero approach to reducing road danger. The DVS categorises HGVs on the level of the driver’s direct vision from the cab.

    We consulted earlier this year on the principles of a new DVS. Listening to the feedback from this consultation and working closely with industry and stakeholders we have now further developed this scheme. The Consultation report and Responses to Issues Raised document from this first phase of consultation are available to view in from the links at the bottom of this text. The responses showed that, in general, there is support for the principle of a Direct Vision Standard.

    We are now seeking your views on proposals to introduce a new Safety Standard Permit Scheme as part of DVS which widens our approach beyond direct vision and includes a safe system approach to allow us to address a broader range of road danger risks.

    The proposed scheme would require all HGVs over 12 tonnes to hold a Safety Permit to operate in Greater London from 2020. HGVs will be given a rating between ‘zero-star’ (lowest) and ‘five-star’ (highest). Only those vehicles rated ‘one star’ and above would be allowed to enter of operate in London from 2020. Zero rated vehicles would only be allowed if they can prove compliance through safe system measures. By 2024 only ‘three-star’ rated HGVs and above would automatically be given a Safety Permit. HGVs rated two star and below would need to demonstrate increased safety through progressive safe system measures.

    The safe system could include specific industry recognised measures such as sensors, visual warnings and comprehensive driver training. The Safety Standard Permit scheme would evolve over time, taking into account advances in technology.

    Detailed information about the scheme and the approach in which we have arrived at our current proposals are set out in the consultation document. A full Integrated Impact Assessment is also included.

    The consultation approach
    We are undertaking a phased consultation approach at key stages of the development of the consultation proposals to implement the Direct Vision Standard:

    Phase 1 (24 January to 18 April 2017) – we set out the case for HGV driver direct vision and consulted on the Mayor of London’s outline proposals to introduce a Direct Vision Standard for HGVs in London and the principles of the Standard itself. The responses showed that, in general, there is support for the principle of a Direct Vision Standard.

    Phase 2a – policy consultation (this consultation) – this current phase of consultation seeks views and feedback on the scheme proposals as outlined above and within the supporting consultation document which includes supporting technical reports including the full Integrated Impact Assessment. Feedback from this phase of consultation will be used to develop a second IIA and finalise the scheme proposals to be included in phase 2b of the consultation.

    Phase 2b - Final scheme proposals and statutory consultation (Spring/Summer 2018) – this final phase will consult on the final proposals for the HGV Safety Standard Permit Scheme, including statutory consultation on the appropriate regulatory measure to ban or restrict HGVs in London under the scheme, subject to UK Government and European Commission support and notification.

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  • London Assembly cycling infrastructure investigation

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    London Assembly says:

    Our investigation
    Over recent years, TfL policy has increasingly focused on the construction of physical cycling infrastructure on London’s roads. A change in direction towards more segregated infrastructure followed our report in 2012 recommending this approach.

    Our investigation will cover the full range of cycling infrastructure in London, with a particular focus on:

    Cycle Superhighways: a form of cycle lane, designed to make cycling safer by helping keep cyclists away from general traffic, and offer direct and continuous cycling on major routes.

    Quietways: a network of cycle routes that link key destinations, improving safety and convenience through small-scale interventions.

    Mini-Hollands: TfL schemes to invest neighbourhood-level improvements in walking and cycling, involving a range of interventions in each area.

    Cycle parking: provision of parking spaces on-street, at stations or in dedicated parking facilities.

    It is important that TfL is able to establish the effectiveness of the infrastructure it installs on London’s roads. We are concerned that to date there has been no comprehensive study of the new infrastructure’s impact on cycling safety, modal share and other road users.

    Questions to answer:

    1. What progress on new cycling infrastructure has been made under Sadiq Khan, and what are his long-term plans?
    2. Has TfL resolved the problems that delayed some cycling schemes under the previous Mayor?
    3. Has segregation delivered the anticipated benefits on the Cycle Superhighways? How many cyclists are using these routes?
    4. To what extent has segregation had negative consequences for other road users and, if necessary, how can this be mitigated?
    5. Have Quietways delivered their anticipated benefits? How many cyclists are using them?
    6. What are the differences in infrastructure between inner and outer London? How can TfL ensure infrastructure in different areas is sufficient and appropriate to the location?
    7. How will TfL’s new ‘Strategic Cycling Analysis’ help determine where and how to invest in infrastructure?
    8. How appropriate is the 400-metre target set in the draft Transport Strategy? Can we equate proximity with access?
    9. Is TfL’s approach to public engagement working effectively to improve scheme designs and meet stakeholder needs?
    10. Are Londoners sufficiently aware of the cycling infrastructure available to them, and how can awareness be increased?
    11. How is TfL using infrastructure to attract a more diverse range of people to cycle in London?
    12. Is there sufficient cycle parking in London, and is it in the right locations?
    13. How are the lessons of the Mini-Hollands and other previous cycling schemes being applied elsewhere?
    14. Should cycling infrastructure be oriented toward longer-distance commuting journeys, or more localised trips?

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  • London Assembly investigation: Walking & Cycling at Outer London Junctions

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    London Assembly says:

    Our investigation
    What different approaches could TfL and London boroughs take to improve junctions and increase walking and cycling in Outer London?

    Small pockets of improvement don’t change the fact that most London streets are dominated by traffic and noise. They are hostile places even to step out into for a pint of milk.

    On behalf of the London Assembly Transport Committee, Caroline Russell AM is investigating how our streets and junctions can become more people-friendly.

    Get involved
    There are a number of specific questions the Committee is seeking to answer. Please address any questions where you have relevant views and information to share, and feel free to cover any other issues you would like the Committee to consider.

    Are there lessons to be learned from previous junction improvements?

    How can we enable more people to walk and cycle?

    How can we make our streets and junctions less hostile to people getting around by bike and on foot?

    How do you get all road users on board?

    Please email transportcommittee@london.gov.uk by August 11 and share the investigation on Twitter using #OuterLondonJunctions

    Key Facts
    The Mayor and TfL are promoting walking and cycling as a form of active travel and a way to reduce health inequalities - however, currently, over 40 percent of Londoners fall short of the recommended 150 minutes of activity per week.

    TfL research has found that people who live in Outer London tend to walk less than those who live in Inner London. Public transport coverage is lower and car ownership is higher in Outer London, with cars making up a larger share of journeys. In particular, people who live in Outer London are less likely to walk children to school, walk to see friends or relatives, and walk to pubs, restaurants and cinemas.

    In 2015:
    53 percent of Inner Londoners walked at least five journeys a week, compared to 35 percent of Outer Londoners
    47 percent of Inner Londoners walked as part of longer journeys on other forms of transport at least five times a week, compared to 41 percent of Outer Londoners

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  • Mayor's Transport Strategy

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    Draft Mayor's Transport Strategy 2017
    On June 21 Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, published a draft of the Mayor's Transport Strategy. The document sets out the Mayor’s policies and proposals to reshape transport in London over the next 25 years.

    About the strategy

    Transport has the potential to shape London, from the streets Londoners live, work and spend time on, to the Tube, rail and bus services they use every day.

    By using the Healthy Streets Approach to prioritise human health and experience in planning the city, the Mayor wants to change London’s transport mix so the city works better for everyone.

    Three key themes are at the heart of the strategy.

    1. Healthy Streets and healthy people
    Creating streets and street networks that encourage walking, cycling and public transport use will reduce car dependency and the health problems it creates.

    2. A good public transport experience
    Public transport is the most efficient way for people to travel over distances that are too long to walk or cycle, and a shift from private car to public transport could dramatically reduce the number of vehicles on London’s streets.

    3. New homes and jobs
    More people than ever want to live and work in London. Planning the city around walking, cycling and public transport use will unlock growth in new areas and ensure that London grows in a way that benefits everyone.

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  • Forest Road - Palmerston Road to Hoe Street

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    Broadly this is a plan for fully segregated tracks on both sides of the road between Palmerston Road e17 and Hoe Street E17. It is the third Forest Road consultation and further detail can be found on the Commonplace website. Previous consultation results may be found on the www.enjoywalthamforest.co.uk microsite.
    This introduction from the Commonplace consultation website:
    "Creating a safer environment
    Results from our perception survey in May 2015 showed that 80 per cent of people who took part felt that some parts of Forest Road felt unsafe. To address this, we want to make a number of road safety improvements, to help you get about more easily."

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  • Billet Road E17

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    The Council has successfully secured funding from Transport for London (TfL) to improve safety for all road users along the whole length of Billet Road. In the last 5 years a total of 62 accidents which involved injuries and fatalities were recorded making this a particular unsafe area within the Borough. The scheme aims to reduce accidents along the road whilst improving the overall safety for all road users.
    In September and October 2015, we sent a survey to local people asking them to identify problems along the road and to tell us what they would like to see to help improve road safety. The results of the survey showed that people were most concerned about crossing the road, getting around the area and not feeling safe when travelling along the road.
    The top improvements people would like to see were; slower traffic, safer crossing points, protected cycle lanes and better pavements.
    We also asked Emergency Services about the issues they faced and what they would like to see to help improve road safety.

    Proposals
    Based on the results of the survey and the feedback from Emergency Services we have
    developed a set of proposals that aim to make improvements for all road users:
    • Bus stop improvements to provide better access for passengers including disabled users.
    • Improve and raise the existing zebra and signal crossings.
    • A new raised zebra crossing on Billet Road near Cecil Road.
    • 20mph speed limit along Billet Road.
    • Better and energy efficient street lighting.
    • Tree planting and footway resurfacing along the road.
    • A new raised road table at Billet Road’s junction with Guildway to reduce traffic speed.
    • Two-way, fully segregated east and west cycle track.
    • New ‘floating’ style bus stop to improve safety for cyclists and bus passengers.
    • Raised areas at junctions that prioritise pedestrians and slow traffic down.
    • De-cluterring of street furniture such as removing redundant posts and signs along Billet Road and side road entrances.
    • Parking bays relocated at certain unsafe locations along the road to be converted to
    segregated cycle track. New parking bays will be provided nearby.
    • Various waiting and loading restriction at locations of concern to improve road safety
    and ensure smooth flow of traffic.
    • Anti-skid surface to help prevent vehicles from skidding.
    Please note there are also a number of locations on the road where future improvements works will be happening outside of this scheme. These are highlighted as ‘future improvement works’ on the plan.

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  • Leyton Town Centre mini-Holland

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    These pages are publicly viewable and for cyclists to discuss consultation responses. Always make sure you *also* respond to the public consultation at its site too!

    Waltham Forest council says:
    Waltham Forest is changing and we want you to be part of it. Thanks to a funding pot of £27 million from Transport for London, we’re delivering the Mini-Holland Programme to make our streets fit for everyone to use, whether you walk, cycle, use public transport or drive.
    In 2014, nearly 900 people were injured on our roads and air pollution in Waltham Forest is on the increase. At peak times of the day, we have up to 6,000 extra cars on our roads due to the school run; we need to do something about it so that everyone can get from A to B safely.
    The Mini-Holland Programme is about making our streets work for everyone and our borough a better place to live, work and visit. By creating designated space for cycling, creating routes that better connect our town centres and redesigning some of our public areas we want to help families get about safely, cut down unnecessary traffic outside your home, and work with businesses so that people want to spend time in our borough and get the most out of this once in a lifetime opportunity.

    Giving your views on the proposed designs
    We want everyone who lives and works in the local area to have their say on the scheme design and help shape the proposals.
    To help manage the consultation and feedback we receive, we are asking you to rate and comment on groups of proposals rather than individual measures, and to tell us what else you would like to see.
    The proposals for the Leyton Town Centre scheme include improving some of the public spaces with plants, trees and public art, changing the way vehicles access some roads to reduce unnecessary traffic outside people’s homes, new and improved crossings to help people who walk and cycle, traffic direction changes and road safety improvements.
    As some of these changes are linked they need to be introduced together, so we have grouped them and are asking for your views by group or ‘series’ of proposals. For example, a new public space with plants, trees and seating may only be possible if access to a road is changed, making it open only to people walking and cycling.
    Please read each proposal carefully, and tell us your thoughts on each one using the comment section at the bottom of each proposal page. Depending on how much you write, we expect the survey to take no more than 10 minutes to complete.

    What’s planned in Leyton Town Centre?
    We have four town centre schemes in the Mini-Holland Programme, one of which is Leyton. These schemes will better connect Leyton, Leytonstone, Chingford and Highams Park, making it easier for people to walk and cycle for local journeys with new and improved walking and cycling routes. The town centre schemes will also improve the look and feel of these key areas whilst linking in with the four Village schemes in Walthamstow, making them more enjoyable places, boosting business for our local economy and giving our residents a sense of pride in their borough.
    The Leyton Town Centre scheme area includes over 11,000 addresses and people walk and cycle through it to get to Leyton Underground Station, Leyton Midland Road Rail Station, the Olympic Park, Westfield shopping centre as well as local shops and amenities.
    We’re planning to make a range of improvements to the area, from reducing the amount of non-local traffic using local streets where residents like you live, to better walking and cycling routes to help you get around more easily and safely if you choose to walk or cycle. We’ll also be investing in new public spaces and improving how the area looks, with new plants and greenery, to encourage more people to spend their time in the area. The proposed design also includes a mix of road and traffic changes which are outlined on the map.

    In June 2015, we sent a survey to all addresses in the scheme area to understand your concerns and how we can use this Mini-Holland funding to deliver what you want in your local area. Over 500 people took part, providing over 690 individual comments which we analysed and used to shape the next stage of the plans.
    This feedback helped create an early design, which we presented to 41 residents as well as businesses that came to our co-design workshops in October 2015. During these workshops you told us what you thought of the proposed design, which has helped develop the scheme.
    We have been speaking to key stakeholders, including the emergency services and schools, to make sure the design enables them to do their important work day to day. We will continue to engage with these groups as the scheme progresses through to final design and completion. We have also used information about traffic movements and traffic survey data to design a scheme that will benefit all road users. More information about this design is detailed in these proposals and we are asking for your views on it.

    What happens next?
    All of the feedback received will be grouped, carefully analysed and used to shape the final design.
    Where there are elements of the scheme that are not well supported by residents and businesses, we will look at these again. Where it’s possible to make changes based on your comments and suggestions we will, and where we can’t we will explain why. A summary of the results and feedback will be sent to everyone who took part after the public consultation stage has ended. This will set out the results and how they have been used to help shape the final design. This will also be available on the website for everyone to see.
    Before we get to the design stage, Transport for London (TfL) will also need to approve all of our plans as the funders of the Mini-Holland programme.

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  • Leytonstone Town Centre mini-Holland

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    These pages are publicly viewable and for cyclists to discuss consultation responses. Always make sure you *also* respond to the public consultation at its site too!

    Waltham Forest council says:

    Waltham Forest is changing and we want you to be part of it. Thanks to a funding pot of £27 million from Transport for London, we’re delivering the Mini-Holland Programme to make our streets fit for everyone to use, whether you walk, cycle, use public transport or drive.
    In 2014, nearly 900 people were injured on our roads and air pollution in Waltham Forest is on the increase. At peak times of the day, we have up to 6,000 extra cars on our roads due to the school run. We need to do something about this so that everyone can get from A to B easily and safely.
    The Mini-Holland Programme is about making our streets work for everyone and our borough a better place to live, work and visit. By creating designated space for cycling, creating routes that better connect our town centres and redesigning some of our public areas we want to help families get about safely, cut down unnecessary traffic outside your home and work with businesses so that people want to spend time in our borough and get the most out of this once in a lifetime opportunity.

    How do I take part?
    We want everyone who lives and works in the local area to have their say on the scheme design and help shape the proposals. To help manage the consultation and feedback we receive, we are asking you to rate and comment on groups of proposals rather than individual measures, and to tell us what else you would like to see.
    Please read each proposal carefully, and tell us your thoughts on each one using the comment section at the bottom of each proposal page. Depending on how much you write, we expect the survey to take no more than 10 minutes to complete.

    What’s planned in Leytonstone Town Centre?
    We have four town centre schemes in the Mini-Holland Programme, one of which is Leytonstone. These schemes will better connect Chingford, Highams Park, Leyton and Leytonstone through key walking and cycling routes, making areas of the borough easier to get to for people who want to walk and cycle for local journeys. The town centre schemes will also improve the look and feel of these four key areas whilst linking in with the four Village schemes in Walthamstow, making them more enjoyable places to spend time and money, boosting business for our local economy and giving our residents a sense of pride in their borough.
    The Leytonstone Town Centre scheme area has over 8,000 addresses and lots of people currently walk and cycle through it to get to the High Road, Leytonstone Underground Station, Leytonstone High Road Rail Station, Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park and Hollow Ponds. We’re planning to make improvements so that if you choose to walk or cycle it’s easier for you to get about. For example, we know that Grove Green Road is a key cycling route through Leytonstone, so we’re planning to improve this by creating segregated areas, where possible, making it safer and easier for people who cycle and vehicles to share the road.
    We’re also planning to install blended ‘Copenhagen’ style crossings on a series of side streets, which extend the pavement across the road, meaning vehicles need to give way to pedestrians and people on cycles. We recognise that there is a place for cars in our borough, but want to make our roads safer by creating junctions that encourage drivers to slow down and take extra care at key points. We’ll also be investing in new public spaces and improving how the area looks with plants and greenery, to encourage more people to spend their time and money in the area. The proposed design also includes a mix of road and traffic direction changes which are shown on the map below.

    What has happened so far?
    In June 2015, we sent a survey to all 8,000 addresses in the scheme area to understand your concerns and aspirations and what you want to see in your local area. Over 340 people responded, providing over 440 individual comments, which we analysed and used to shape the next stage of the plans.
    This feedback helped create an early design which was presented to over 60 residents who attended our codesign workshops in September and October 2015. During these workshops local residents and businesses told us their views of the proposed design to help us make sure this scheme fits everyone’s needs. We have been speaking to key stakeholders (including the emergency services and schools) to make sure the design enables them to do their important work.
    We will continue to engage with these groups as the scheme progresses through to final design and completion. We have also used information about traffic movements and traffic survey data to design a scheme that benefits all road users. More information about this design is detailed in these proposals and we are asking for your views on it.

    What happens next?
    All of the feedback received will be grouped, carefully analysed and used to shape the final design. Where there are elements of the scheme that are not well supported by residents and businesses, we will look at these again. Where it’s possible to make changes based on your comments and suggestions we will, and where we can’t we will explain why.
    A summary of the results and feedback will be sent to everyone who took part after the public consultation stage has ended. This will set out the results and how they have been used to help shape the final design. This will also be available on the website for everyone to see.
    Before we get to the design stage, Transport for London (TfL) will also need to approve the plans as the funders of the Mini-Holland Programme.

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